Texas Health Surgery Center Park Hill

Corneal Disease

Cornea specialists diagnose and treat a wide variety of diseases and injuries to the cornea.

Knowing What to Expect

Preparing for surgery can feel overwhelming or scary if you don’t know what to expect. You may have some unanswered questions and worries that make you feel this way. Knowing what to expect will help you feel less nervous and more in control.

Cornea specialists diagnose and treat a wide variety of diseases and injuries to the cornea. They also include refractive surgeons who alter the shape of the cornea (LASIK) to improve vision. 

There are several conditions that can affect the cornea, including infections (such as bacterial or viral keratitis), inflammatory diseases, trauma, lesions, genetic disorders, degenerative disorders, autoimmune disorders, nutrition deficiencies, allergies, dystrophies and ectatic disorders (such as keratoconus). The cornea can also be damaged secondarily by other eye conditions such as dry eye syndrome and other tear-film abnormalities, eyelid disorders (keratoconjunctivitis sicca), and glaucoma.

Diagnosis of Corneal Disease

Blurred vision occurs whenever a disease affects either the clarity or the curvature of the cornea. Pain, sometimes quite severe, occurs if the illness affects the nerves in or near the cornea. Trauma resulting in cuts or abrasions of the cornea may also cause pain. Irritation and light sensitivity are common symptoms in many disorders affecting the surface of the cornea.

Treatment for Corneal Disease

When corneas are permanently clouded or injured, cornea surgeons may perform corneal grafts (Cornea Transplant Surgery). The cornea surgeons will identify those potential recipients least likely to reject the tissue and treat the transplanted cornea with appropriately selected eye drops. They also perform reconstructive surgery to repair trauma to the cornea, iris and lens and to remove foreign objects lodged in the surface of the eye.